JFK MEDICAL TRETMENT EVEIDENCE,

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        Parkland Hospital Dallas Doctors - Head, Throat gunshot Wound Description JFK Assassination Shots.

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PARKLAND HOSPITAL, HEAD WOUND medical Description:

Dr. Akin - Dr. Bashour - Dr. Baxter - Nurse Bowron - Dr. Carrico - Dr. Clark - Dr. Giesecke -

Dr. Jenkins - Dr. Jones - Dr. McClelland - Dr. Perry - Dr. Peters - Dr. Salyer

Parkland Hospital Dallas Doctors, JFK Assassination:

DR. Gene Coleman Akin, Anesthesiology.:
"The back of the right occipitalparietal portion of his head was shattered, with brain substance extruding."


Dr. Fouad Bashour, cardiology:
"The President was lying on the stretcher, the head wound was massive, the blood was dripping from the head, and at that time the President had an endotracheal tube."


Dr. Charles Rufus Baxter, general surgeon:
"There was a large gaping wound in the skull which was covered at that time with blood, and its extent was not immediately determined."
*** "we had an opportunity to look at his head wound then and saw that the damage was beyond hope, that is, in a word-- literally the right side of his head had been blown off. With this and the observation that the cerebellum was present--a large quantity of brain was present on the cart."
*** "The only wound that I actually saw--Dr. Clark examined this above the manubrium of the sternum, the sternal notch. This wound was in temporal parietal plate of bone laid outward to the side and there was a large area, oh, I would say 6 by 8 or 10 cm. of lacerated brain oozing from this wound."
Mr. SPECTER. Did you notice any bullet hole below that large opening at the top of the head?
Dr. BAXTER. No; I personally did not.
                                                                                                                          


Diana Bowron, registered nurse:
Mr. SPECTER. And what, in a general way, did you observe with respect to President Kennedy's condition?
Miss BOWRON. He was very pale, he was lying across Mrs. Kennedy's knee and there seemed to be blood everywhere. When I went around to the other side of the car I saw the condition of his head.
Mr. SPECTER. You saw the condition of his what?
Miss BOWRON. The back of his head.
Mr. SPECTER. And what was that condition?
Miss BOWRON. Well, it was very bad---you know.
Mr. SPECTER. How many holes did you see?
Miss BOWRON. I just saw one large hole.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you see a small bullet hole beneath that one large hole?
Miss BOWRON. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you notice any other wound on the President's body?
Miss BOWRON. No, sir.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Charles James Carrico, surgery:
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe as specifically as you can the head wound which you have already mentioned briefly?
Dr. CARRICO. Sure. This was a 5- by 71-cm defect in the posterior skull, the occipital region. There was an absence of the calvarium or skull in this area, with shredded tissue, brain tissue present and initially considerable slow oozing. Then after we established some circulation there was more profuse bleeding from this wound.
Mr. SPECTER. Was any other wound observed on the head in addition to this large opening where the skull was absent?
Dr. CARRICO. No other wound on the head.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you have any opportunity specifically to look for a small wound which was below the large opening of the skull on the right side of the head?
Dr. CARRICO. No, sir; ***


Dr. William Kemp Clark, neurological Surgeon:
"I then examined the wound in the back of the President's head. This was a large, gaping wound in the right posterior part, with cerebral and cerebellar tissue being damaged and exposed."
***
Mr. SPECTER. What, if anything, did you say then in the course of that press conference ?
Dr. CLARK. I described the President's wound in his head in very much the same way as I have described it here. I was asked if this wound was an entrance wound, an exit wound, or what, and I said it could be an exit wound, but I felt it was a tangential wound.
Mr. SPECTER. Which wound did you refer to at this time ?
Dr. CLARK. The wound in the head.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you describe at that time what you meant by "tangential"?
Dr. CLARK. Yes, sir; I did.
Mr. SPECTER. What definition of "tangential" did you make at that time?
Dr. CLARK. As I remember, I defined the word "tangential" as being---striking an object obliquely, not squarely or head on.
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe at this time in somewhat greater detail the consequences of a tangential wound as contrasted with another type of a striking ?
***
Dr. CLARK. The effects of any missile striking an organ or a function of the energy which is shed by the missile in passing through this organ when a bullet strikes the head, if it is able to pass through rapidly without shedding any energy into the brain, little damage results, other than that part of the brain which is directly penetrated by the missile. However, if it strikes the skull at an angle, it must then penetrate much more bone than normal, therefore, is likely to shed more energy, striking the brain a more powerful blow. Secondly, in striking the bone in this manner, it may cause pieces of the bone to be blown into the brain and thus act as secondary missiles. Finally, the bullet itself may be deformed and deflected so that it would go through or penetrate parts of the brain, not in the usual direct line it was proceeding.
***
Mr. SPECTER Now, you described the massive wound at the top of the President's head, with the brain protruding; did you observe any other hole or wound on the President's head?
Dr. CLARK. No, sir; I did not.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe, to make my question very specific, a bullet hole or what appeared to be a bullet hole in the posterior scalp, approximately 2.5 cm. laterally to the right, slightly above the external occipital protuberant, measuring 15 by 6 mm.
Dr. CLARK. No, sir; I did not. This could easily have been hidden in the blood and hair.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any bullet wounds or any other wound on the back side of the President?
Dr. CLARK. No, sir; I did not.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Dr. Clark, would your observations be consistent with some other alleged facts in this matter, such as the presence of a lateral wound measuring 15 by 6 mm. on the posterior scalp approximately 2.5 cm. laterally to the right and slightly above the external occipital proturberant--that is to say, could such a hole have been present without your observing it?
Dr. CLARK. Yes, in the presence of this much destruction of skull and scalp above such a wound and lateral to it and the brief period of time available for examination--yes, such a wound could be present.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Adolph Hartung Giesecke, Jr, anesthesiology:
As I moved around towards the head of the emergency cart with the anesthesia machine and the resuscitative equipment and helped Dr. Jenkins to hook the anesthesia machine up to the President to give him oxygen, I noticed that he had a very large cranial wound, with loss of brain substance, and it seemed that most of the bleeding was coming from the cranial wound.
Mr. SPECTER. What did you observe specifically as to the nature of the cranial wound ?
Dr. GIESECKE. It seemed that from the vertex to the left ear, and from the browline to the occiput on the left-hand side of the head the cranium was entirely missing.
Mr. SPECTER. Was that the left-hand side of the head, or the right-hand side of the head ?
Dr. GIESECKE. I would say the left, but this is just my memory of it.
Mr. SPECTER. That's your recollection ?
Dr. GIESECKE. Right, like I say, I was there a very short time really.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any other wound or bullet hole below the large area of missing skull ?
Dr. GIESECKE. No; when I arrived the tracheotomy was in progress at that time and so I observed no other wound except the one on the cranium.
Mr. SPECTER. On the cranium itself, did you observe another bullet hole below the portion of missing skull ?
Dr. GIESECKE. No, sir; this was found later by Dr. Clark--I didn't see this.
Mr. SPECTER. What makes you say that that hole was found later by Dr. Clark?
Dr. GIESECKE. Well, this is hearsay--I wasn't there when they found it and I didn't notice it.
Mr. SPECTER. Well, Dr. Clark didn't observe that hole.
Dr. GIESECKE. Oh, he didn't--I'm sorry.
Mr. SPECTER. From whom did you hear that the hole had been observed, if you recollect?
Dr. GIESECKE-. Oh--I must be confused. We talked to so many people about these things--I don't remember.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Marion Thomas Jenkins, Anesthesiology:
Mr. SPECTER. Now, will you now describe the wound which you observed in the head?
Dr. JENKINS. Almost by the time I was--had the time to pay more attention to the wound in the head, all of these other activities were under way. I was busy connecting up an apparatus to respire for the patient, exerting manual pressure on the breathing bag or anesthesia apparatus, trying to feel for a pulse in the neck, and then reaching up and feeling for one in the temporal area, seeing about connecting the cardioscope or directing its being connected, and then turned attention to the wound in the head. Now, Dr. Clark had begun closed chest cardiac massage at this time and I was aware of the magnitude of the wound, because with each compression of the chest, there was a great rush of blood from the skull wound. Part of the brain was herniated; I really think part of the cerebellum, as I recognized it, was herniated from the wound; there was part of the brain tissue, broken fragments of the brain tissue on the drapes of the cart on which the President lay.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any wounds immediately below the massive loss of skull which you have described?
Dr. JENKINS. On the right side?
Mr. SPECTER. Yes, sir.
Dr. JENKINS. No---I don't know whether this is right or not, but I thought there was a wound on the left temporal area, right in the hairline and right above the zygomatic process.
Mr. SPECTER. The autopsy report discloses no such development, Dr. Jenkins.
Dr. JENKINS. Well, I was feeling for---I was palpating here for a pulse to see whether the closed chest cardiac massage was effective or not and this probably was some blood that had come from the other point and so I thought there was a wound there also.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Ronald Coy Jones, General Surgery:
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe as precisely as you can the nature of the head wound ?
Dr. JONES. There was large defect in the back side of the head as the President lay on the cart with what appeared to be some brain hanging out of this wound with multiple pieces of skull noted next with the brain and with a tremendous amount of clot and blood.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Have you ever had any formal training in bullet wounds?
Dr. JONES. No.
Mr. SPECTER. Have you ever had occasion to observe a bullet wound which was inflicted by a missile at approximate size of a 6.5 ram. bullet which passed through the body of a person and exited from a neck without striking anything but soft tissue from the back through the neck, where the missile came from a weapon of the muzzle velocity of 2,000 feet per second, and the victim was in the vicinity of 160 to 250 feet from the weapon?
Dr. JONES. No; I have not seen a missile of this velocity exit in the anterior portion of the neck. I have seen it in other places of the body, but not in the neck.
Mr. SPECTER. What other places in the body have you seen it, Dr. Jones?
Dr. JONES. I have seen it in the extremity and here it produces a massive amount of soft tissue destruction.
Mr. SPECTER. Is that in the situation of struck bone or not struck bone or what?
Dr. JONES. Probably where it has struck bone.
Mr. SPECTER. In a situation where it strikes bone, however, the bone becomes so to speak a secondary missile, does it not, in accentuating the soft tissue damage?
Dr. JONES. Yes.
Mr. SPECTER. Dr. Jones, did you have any speculative thought as to accounting for the point of wounds which you observed on the President, as you thought about it when you were treating the President that day, or shortly thereafter?
Dr. JONES. With no history as to the number of times that the President had been shot or knowing the direction from which he had been shot, and seeing the wound in the midline of the neck, and what appeared to be an exit wound in the posterior portion of the skull, the only speculation that I could have as far as to how this could occur with a single wound would be that would enter the anterior neck and possibly strike a vertebral body and then change its course and exit in the region of the posterior portion of the head. However, this was--there was some doubt that a missile that appeared to be of this high velocity would suddenly change its course by striking, but at the present-at that time, if I accounted for it on the basis of one shot, that would have been the way I accounted for it.
Mr. SPECTER. And would that account take into consideration the extensive damage done to the top of the President's head ?
Dr. JONES. If this were the course of the missile, it probably--possibly could have accounted for it, although I would possibly expect it to do a tremendous amount of damage to the vertebral column that it hit and if this were a high velocity missile would also think that the entrance wound would probably be larger than the one that was present at the time we saw
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe whether or not there was any damage to the vertebral column ?
Dr. JONES. No, we could not see this.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you discuss this theory with any other doctor or doctors?
Dr. JONES. Yes; this was discussed after the assassination.
Mr. SPECTER. With whom ?
Dr. JONES. With Dr. Perry--is the only one that I recall specifically, and that was merely as to how many times the President was shot, because even immediately after death, within a matter of 30 minutes, the possibility of a second gunshot wound was entertained and that possibly he had been shot more than once.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Robert Nelson McClelland, general surgery:
Mr. SPECTER. Before proceeding to describe what you did in connection with the tracheostomy, will you more fully describe your observation with respect to the head wound?
Dr. MCCLELLAND. As I took the position at the head of the table that I have already described, to help out with the tracheotomy, I was in such a position that I could very closely examine the head wound, and I noted that the right posterior portion of the skull had been extremely blasted. It had been shattered, apparently, by the force of the shot so that the parietal bone was protruded up through the scalp and seemed to be fractured almost along its right posterior half, as well as some of the occipital bone being fractured in its lateral haft, and this sprung open the bones that I mentioned in such a way that you could actually look down into the skull cavity itself and see that probably a third or so, at least, of the brain tissue, posterior cerebral tissue and some of the cerebellar tissue had been blasted out. There was a large amount of bleeding which was occurring mainly from the large venous channels in the skull which had been blasted open.
***
Mr. SPECTER. What were your initial impressions?
Dr. McCLELLAND. The initial impression that we had was that perhaps the wound in the neck, the anterior part of the neck, was an entrance wound and that it had perhaps taken a trajectory off the anterior vertebral body and again into the skull itself, exiting out the back, to produce the massive injury in the head. However, this required some straining of the imagination to imagine that this would happen, and it was much easier to explain the apparent trajectory by means of two bullets, which we later found out apparently had been fired, than by just one then, on which basis we were originally taking to explain it.
Mr. SPECTER. Through the use of the pronoun "we" in your last answer, to whom do you mean by "we"?
Dr. McCLELLAND. Essentially all of the doctors that have previously been mentioned here.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe the condition of the back of the President's head ?
Dr. McCLELLAND. Well, partially; not, of course, as I say, we did not lift his head up since it was so greatly damaged. We attempted to avoid moving him any more than it was absolutely necessary, but I could see, of course, all the extent of the wound.
Mr. SPECTER. You saw a large opening which you have already described?
Dr. McCLELLAND. I saw the large opening which I have described.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any other wound on the back of the head?
Dr. McCLELLAND. No.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe a small gunshot wound below the large opening on the back of the head ?
Dr. McCLELLAND. No.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Malcolm Oliver Perry, physician and surgeon:
Mr. SPECTER. Will you continue, then, Dr. Perry, as to what you observed of his condition?
Dr. PERRY. Yes, there was blood noted on the carriage and a large avulsive wound on the right posterior cranium. I cannot state the size, I did not examine it at all. I just noted the presence of lacerated brain tissue. In the lower part of the neck below the Adams apple was a small, roughly circular wound of perhaps 5 mm. in diameter from which blood was exuding slowly. I did not see any other wounds.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Will you now describe as specifically as you can, the injury which you noted in the President's head?
Dr. PERRY. As I mentioned previously in the record, I made only a cursory examination of the President's head. I noted a large avulsive wound of the right parietal occipital area, in which both scalp and portions of skull were absent, and there was severe laceration of underlying brain tissue. My examination did not go any further than that.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you, to be specific, observe a smaller wound below the large avulsed area which you have described?
Dr. PERRY. I did not.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any wound in the President's chest?
Dr. PERRY. I did not.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any wound on the left side of the President's head?
Dr. PERRY. No, sir.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Paul Conrad Peters, Doctor of medicine:
Mr. SPECTER What did you observe as to the nature of the President's wound?
Dr. PETERS. Well, as I mentioned, the neck wound had already been interfered with by the tracheotomy at the time I got there, but I noticed the head wound, and as I remember--I noticed that there was a large defect in the occiput.
Mr. SPECTER What did you notice in the occiput?
Dr. PETERS. It seemed to me that in the right occipitalparietal area that there was a large defect. There appeared to be bone loss and brain loss in the area.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you notice any holes below the occiput, say, in this area below here?
Dr. PETERS. No, I did not and at the time and the moments immediately following the injury, we speculated as to whether he had been shot once or twice because we saw the wound of entry in the throat and noted the large occipital wound, and it is a known fact that high velocity missiles often have a small wound of entrance and a large wound of exit, and I'm just giving you my honest impressions at the time.
Mr. SPECTER. What were they?
Dr. PETERS. Well, I wondered whether or not he had been shot once or twice that was my question at the time.
Mr. SPECTER. When you say "we speculate," whom do you mean by that?
Dr. PETERS. Well, the doctors in attendance there.
Mr. SPECTER. Any doctor specifically?
Dr. PETERS. I wouldn't mention anyone specifically, we all discussed it. I did not know whether or not he had been shot once or twice.


Dr. Kenneth Everett Salyer, Physician:
Mr. SPECTER. What did you observe with respect to the head wound?
Dr. SALYER. I came in on the left side of him and noticed that his major wound seemed to be in his right temporal area, at least from the point of view that I could see him, and other than that--nothing other than he did have a gaping scalp wound-- cranial wound.

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The back of his head....Well, it was very bad---you know.
 


PARKLAND HOSPITAL, THROAT-NECK WOUND medical Description:

Dr. Akin - Dr. Bashour - Dr. Baxter - Dr. Carrico - Dr. Clark - Nurse Henchliffe -

Dr. Jenkins - Dr. Jones - Dr. McClelland - Dr. Perry - Dr. Salyer
                                                                                                                                           

Parkland Hospital Dallas Doctors, JFK Assassination:     WB01624_.gif (281 bytes) [ BACK ] JFK Autopsy Page ( 3 ) 

DR. Gene Coleman Akin, Anesthesiology.:
"There was a midline neck wound below the level of the cricoid cartilage, about 1 to 1.5 cm. in diameter, the lower part of this had been cut across when I saw the wound, it had been cut across with a knife in the performance of the tracheotomy."

Mr. SPECTER. And as to the neck wound, did you have occasion to observe whether there was a smooth, jagged, or what was the nature of the portion of the neck wound which had not been cut by the tracheotomy?
Dr. AKIN. "It was slightly ragged around the edges."


Dr. Fouad Bashour, cardiology
Mr. SPECTER.: Did you have an opportunity to see the neck wound before the tracheotomy was performed?
Dr. BASHOUR. No; I came after everything was done to him.


Dr. Charles Rufus Baxter, general surgeon:
"The wound on the neck was approximately an inch and a haft above the manubrium of the sternum, the sternal notch. This wound was in my estimation, 4 to 5 mm. in widest diameter and was a spherical wound. The edges of it--the size of the wound is measured by the hole plus the damaged skin around the area, so that it was a very small wound."
                                                                                                                          

Dr. Charles James Carrico, surgery:
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe, as specifically as you can then, the neck wounds which you heretofore mentioned briefly?
Dr. CARRICO. There was a small wound, 5- to 8-mm. in size, located in the lower third of the neck, below the thyroid cartilage, the Adams apple.
Mr. DULLES. Will you show us about where it was?
Dr. CARRICO. Just about where your tie would be.
Mr. DULLES. Where did it enter?
Dr. CARRICO. It entered?
Mr. DULLES. Yes.
Dr. CARRICO. At the time we did not know
Mr. DULLES. I see.
Dr. CARRICO. The entrance. All we knew this was a small wound here.
Mr. DULLES. I see. And you put your hand right above where your tie is?
Dr. CARRICO. Yes, sir; just where the tie--
Mr. DULLES. A little bit to the left.
Dr. CARRICO. To the right.
Mr. DULLES. Yes; to the right.
Dr. CARRICO. Yes. And this wound was fairly round, had no jagged edges, no evidence of powder burns, and so forth.


Dr. William Kemp Clark, neurological Surgeon:
***
Dr. CLARK. I remember using the phrase to describe the location of a wound in the President's throat as being at the point of his knot of his necktie. I do not recall ever specifically stating that this was an entrance wound, as has been said before. I was not present when the President arrived and did not see this wound. If any statement regarding its entrance or exit was made by me, it was indicating that there was a small wound described there by the physicians who first saw the President.

                                                                                                                          

Margaret M. Henchliffe, nurse:
Mr. SPECTER. Did you see any wound on any other part of his body?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Yes; in the neck.
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe it, please?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. It was just a little hole in the middle of his neck.
Mr. SPECTER. About how big a hole was it?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. About as big around as the end of my little finger.
Mr. SPECTER. Have you ever had any experience with bullet holes?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Yes.
Mr. SPECTER. And what did that appear to you to be?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. An entrance bullet hole it looked to me like.
Mr. SPECTER. Could it have been an exit bullet hole?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. I have never seen an exit bullet hole I don't remember seeing one that looked like that.
Mr. SPECTER. What were the characteristics of the hole?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. It was just a little round---just a little round hole, just a little round jagged-looking---jagged a little bit.
Mr. SPECTER. What experience have you had in observing bullet holes, Miss Henchliffe?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Well, we take care of a lot of bullet wounds down there--I don't know how many a year.
Mr. SPECTER. Have you ever had any formal studies of bullet holes?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Oh, no; nothing except my experience in the emergency room.
Mr. SPECTER. In what?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. In the emergency room is all.
***
(In approximately 3 minutes thereafter the witness returned to the deposing room and the deposition continued as follows:)
Mr. SPECTER. Let me ask you a couple of questions more, Miss Henchliffe, one other question, or two, before you go.
Was the wound on the front of the neck surrounded by any blood?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. Was there any blood at all in that area?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. No, sir.
Mr. SPECTER. What was there about the wound, if you recall anything special, which gave you the impression it was an entrance wound?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Well, it was just a small wound and wasn't jagged like most of the exit bullet wounds that I have seen.
Mr. SPECTER. If there was a high-powered rifle, or a high-powered rifle was going at a fast speed, as fast as 2,000 feet per second, which encountered only soft tissue in the body, would you have sufficient knowledge to know whether or not the appearance of that hole would be consistent with an exit wound?
Miss HENCHLIFFE. Well, from some information I received in talking to someone about guns later on, they said that this is possible. But you have a small exit wound---you could have a small exit wound.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Marion Thomas Jenkins, Anesthesiology:
Mr. SPECTER Would you describe that wound as specifically as you can?
Dr. JENKINS. Well, I'm afraid my description of it would not be as accurate, of course, as that of the surgeons who were doing the tracheotomy, because my look was a quick look before connecting up the endotracheal tube to the apparatus to help in ventilation and respiration for the patient, and I was aware later in the day, as I should have put it in the report, that I thought this was a wound of exit because it was not a clean wound, and by "clean" clearly demarcated, round, punctate wound which is the usual wound of an entrance wound, made by a missile and at some speed. Of course, entrance wounds with a lobbing type missile, can make a jagged wound also, but I was of the impression and I recognized I had the impression it was an exit wound. However, my mental appreciation for a wound--for the wound in the neck, I believe, was sort of--was overshadowed by recognition of the wound in the scalp and skull plate.


Dr. Ronald Coy Jones, General Surgery:
Mr. SPECTER. Did you observe any wounds ?
Dr. JONES. As we saw him the first time, we noticed that he had a small wound at the midline of the neck, just above the superasternal notch, and this was probably no greater than a quarter of an inch in greatest diameter, and that he had a large wound in the right posterior side of the head.
Mr. SPECTER. When you say "we noticed," whom do you mean by that?
Dr. JONES. Well, Dr. Perry and I were the two that were there at this time observing.
Mr. SPECTER. Did Dr. Perry make any comment about the nature of the wound at that time? Either wound?
Dr. JONES. Not that I recall.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Will you describe as precisely as you can the wound that you observed in the throat ?
Dr. JONES. The wound in the throat was probably no larger than a quarter of an inch in diameter. There appeared to be no powder burn present, although this could have been masked by the amount of blood that was on the head and neck, although there was no obvious, amount of powder present. There appeared to be a very minimal amount of disruption of interruption of the surrounding skin. There appeared to be relatively smooth edges around the wound, and if this occurred as a result of a missile, you would have probably thought it was a missile of very low velocity and probably could have been compatible with a bone fragment of either--probably exiting from the neck, but it was a very small, smooth wound.
Mr. SPECTER. Did you notice any lump in the throat area ?
Dr. JONES. No; I didn't.
Mr. SPECTER. Was there any blood on the throat area in the vicinity of the wound which you have described of the throat?
Dr. JONES. Not a great deal of blood, as if in relation to the amount that was around the head--not too much.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Dr. Jones, I now hand you a report which purports to bear your signature, labeled "Summary of treatment of the President," dated November 23, 1963, which I shall now ask the Court Reporter to mark as Dr. Jones' Exhibit No. 1.
(Instrument mentioned marked by the Reporter as Dr. Jones' Exhibit No. 1, for identification.)
Mr. SPECTER. I ask you if this in fact is your signature ?
Dr. JONES. Yes.
Mr. SPECTER. And I ask you if this was the report which you submitted concerning your participation of the treatment of President Kennedy?
Dr. JONES. Yes; it was.
Mr. SPECTER. In this report, Dr. Jones, you state the following, "Previously described severe skull and brain injury was noted as well as a small hole in anterior midline of the neck thought to be a bullet entrance wound. What led you to the thought that it was a bullet entrance wound, sir?
Dr. JONES. The hole was very small and relatively clean cut, as you would see in a bullet that is entering rather than exiting from a patient. If this were an exit wound, you would think that it exited at a very low velocity to produce no more damage than this had done, and if this were a missile of high velocity, you would expect more of an explosive type of exit wound, with more tissue destruction than this appeared to have on superficial examination.
Mr. SPECTER. Would it be consistent, then, with an exit wound, but of low velocity, as you put it?
Dr. JONES. Yes; of very low velocity to the point that you might think that this bullet barely made it through the soft tissues and just enough to drop out of the skin on the opposite side

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Robert Nelson McClelland, general surgery:
Dr. McCLELLAND. The neck wound, when I first arrived, was at this time converted into a tracheotomy incision. The skin incision had been made by Dr. Perry, and he told me---although I did not see that---that he had made the incision through a very small, perhaps less than one quarter inch in diameter wound in the neck.
Mr. SPECTER. Do you recall whether he described it any more precisely than that?
Dr. McCLELLAND. He did not at that time.
Mr. SPECTER. Has he ever described it any more precisely for you?
Dr. McCLELLAND. He has since that time.
Mr. SPECTER. And what description has he given of it since that time?
Dr. MCCLELLAND. As well as I can recall, the description that he gave was essentially as I have just described, that it was a very small injury, with clear cut, although somewhat irregular margins of less than a quarter inch in diameter, with minimal tissue damage surrounding it on the skin.
Mr. SPECTER. Now, was there anything left for you to observe of that bullet wound, or had the incision obliterated it?
Dr. McCLELLAND. The incision had obliterated it, essentially, the skin portion, that is.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Based on the experience that you have described for us with gunshot wounds and your general medical experience, would you characterize the description of the wound that Dr. Perry gave you as being a wound of entrance or a wound of exit, or was the description which you got from Dr. Perry and Dr. Baxter and Dr. Carrico who were there before, equally consistent with whether or not it was a wound of entrance or a wound of exit, or how would you characterize it in your words?
Dr. McCLELLAND. I would say it would be equally consistent with either type wound, either an entrance or an exit type wound. It would be quite difficult to say--impossible.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Malcolm Oliver Perry, physician and surgeon:
Mr. SPECTER. Will you continue, then, Dr. Perry, as to what you observed of his condition?
Dr. PERRY. Yes, there was blood noted on the carriage and a large avulsive wound on the right posterior cranium. I cannot state the size, I did not examine it at all. I just noted the presence of lacerated brain tissue. In the lower part of the neck below the Adams apple was a small, roughly circular wound of perhaps 5 mm. in diameter from which blood was exuding slowly. I did not see any other wounds.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Why did you elect to make the tracheotomy incision through the wound in the neck, Dr. Perry?
Dr. PERRY. The area of the wound, as pointed out to you in the lower third of the neck anteriorly is customarily the spot one would electively perform the tracheotomy. This is one of the safest and easiest spots to reach the trachea. In addition the presence of the wound indicated to me there was possibly an underlaying wound to the neck muscles in the neck, the carotid artery or the jugular vein. If you are going to control these it is necessary that the incision be as low, that is toward the heart or lungs as the wound if you are going to obtain adequate control. Therefore, for expediency's sake I went directly to that level to obtai control of the airway.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Dr. Perry, you mentioned an injury to the trachea. Will you describe that as precisely as you can, please?
Dr. PERRY. Yes. Once the transverse incision through the skin and subcutaneous tissues was made, it was necessary to separate the strap muscles covering the anterior muscles of the windpipe and thyroid. At that point the trachea was noted to be deviated slightly to the left and I found it necessary to sever the exterior strap muscles on the other side to reach the trachea. I noticed a small ragged laceration of the trachea on the anterior lateral right side. I could see the endotracheal tube which had been placed by Dr. Carrico in the wound, but there was evidence of air and blood around the tube because I noted the cuff was just above the injury to the trachea.
***
Mr. SPECTER. Would you now describe as particularly as possible the neck wound you observed?
Dr. PERRY. This was situated in the lower anterior one-third of the neck, approximately 5 mm. in diameter. It was exuding blood slowly which partially obscured it. Its edges were neither ragged nor were they punched out, but rather clean.
Mr. SPECTER. Have you now described the neck wound as specifically as you can?
Dr. PERRY. I have.
Mr. SPECTER. Based on your observations of the neck wound alone, do you have a sufficient basis to form an opinion as to whether it was an entrance wound or an exit wound.
Dr. PERRY. No, sir. I was unable to determine that since I did not ascertain the exact trajectory of the missile. The operative procedure which I performed was restricted to securing an adequate airway and insuring there was no injury to the carotid artery or jugular vein at that level and at that point I made the procedure.
Mr. SPECTER. Based on the appearance of the neck wound alone, could it have been either an entrance or an exit wound?
Dr. PERRY. It could have been either.

                                                                                                                          

Dr. Kenneth Everett Salyer, Physician:
Mr. SPECTER. I had asked you a moment ago whether you had an opportunity to observe the condition of the President's throat.
Dr. SALYER. Right.
Mr. SPECTER. What was your answer to that question?
Dr. SALYER The answer was--there were a lot of doctors standing around, and I didn't really get to observe the nature of the wound in the throat.

                                                                                                                          
                                                    Full Text available on the [JFK LINKS] Page (Parkland Hospital)

 

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